Verizon Wants To Ban States From Protecting Your Privacy

DSLReports that Verizon sent a letter and white paper last week to the FCC, insisting that “the FCC has ample authority to pre-empt state efforts to protect consumer privacy, and should act to prevent states from doing so.” Verizon’s letter reads in part: “Allowing every State and locality to chart its own course for regulating broadband is a recipe for disaster. It would impose localized and likely inconsistent burdens on an inherently interstate service, would drive up costs, and would frustrate federal efforts to encourage investment and deployment by restoring the free market that long characterized Internet access service.” From the report: But there’s several things Verizon is ignoring here. One being that the only reason states are trying to pass privacy laws is because Verizon lobbyists convinced former Verizon lawyer and FCC boss Ajit Pai that it was a good idea to kill the FCC’s relatively modest rules. It’s also worth noting that ISPs like Verizon (and the lawmakers paid to love them) have cried about protecting “states rights” when states try to pass protectionist laws hamstringing competitors, but in this case appears eager to trample those same state rights should states actually try and protect consumers. Verizon makes it abundantly clear it’s also worried that when the FCC votes to kill net neutrality rules later this year, states will similarly try to pass their own rules protecting consumers, something Verizon clearly doesn’t want. “States and localities have given strong indications that they are prepared to take a similar approach to net neutrality laws if they are dissatisfied with the result of the Restoring Internet Freedom proceeding,” complains Verizon, again ignoring that its lawsuits are the reason that’s happening.


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How your brain responds to certain words might predict your suicide risk

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When a person becomes suicidal, they don’t necessarily rush to tell friends, family, or even their doctor. They might feel ashamed of their thoughts and emotions, and wish instead for them to simply disappear. 

The stigma surrounding suicide is partly why it’s hard to predict and prevent. But doctors also don’t have great tools to diagnose whether someone is suicidal; patients can conceal self-harm and minimize their experiences when completing questionnaires designed to detect suicidal thinking.

This week, however, a group of researchers published a new study that demonstrates how a novel brain imaging technique can identify people who have suicidal thoughts, simply by presenting them with certain key words, asking them to reflect on their meaning, and using machine learning to analyze that brain activity.  Read more…

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I feel like I know these computer-generated celebrities already

 If there’s one thing this Earth of ours is short on, it’s celebrities. I mean, if there were enough, why would they keep making them? We need the help of our computer friends. Luckily they are obliging. An AI that in its existence has only known the faces of celebs (how I envy it!) was tasked with making up new ones by the dozen. The results are… well, you should see for… Read More

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Eight dead in truck attack on Manhattan bike path; suspect arrested

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A pickup truck driver killed eight people and injured more than a dozen others when he drove down a New York City bike path on Tuesday afternoon in what authorities said was a terrorist attack.

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U.S. senators hammer Facebook for power over elections

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. senators on Tuesday pressed Facebook Inc’s chief lawyer on why the company did not catch 2016 election ads bought using Russian rubles, why its investigation of them took so long and how much it knows about its 5 million advertisers.

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Hillary Clinton jokes about going as 'the president' for Halloween

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Hillary Clinton needs a last-minute Halloween costume, and she’s joked that she’ll be “the president.”

At a book tour event in Chicago Monday night, moderator Cheryl Strayed asked Clinton about her Halloween plans. Clinton mulled it over before giving this answer: “I’m thinking I will maybe come as the president.”

Here’s the moment:

This could be interpreted as dressing up as President Trump, or as her supporters wishfully thought, she might’ve meant what could have been: Madam President

It’s funny timing either way with Fox News host Sean Hannity accidentally calling her President Clinton Monday night.  Read more…

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AT&T wants to put AI in the public's hands

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Thanks to AT&T, you may soon be able to build your own AI-powered app. 

The Acumos “AI Marketplace,” launched with open-source nonprofit the Linux Foundation, is currently open for “initial access” to companies who pay a registration fee. The platform will be released to the public, for free, in early 2018. 

Acumos will provide a platform through which developers can select AI capabilities (such as location tracking and facial recognition) and string them together to create apps. The interface will be easy to use, according to Mazin Gilbert, AT&T Labs’ vice president of advanced technology. Read more…

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AMD, Which Lost Over $2.8 Billion In 5 Years, Takes a Hit After New Report

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: On Monday, AMD’s stock price plunged nearly 9 percent after a report by Morgan Stanley, a major investment bank, which found that “microprocessor momentum” has slowed. According to CNBC, a new report by analyst Joseph Moore found that “cryptocurrency mining driven sales for AMD’s graphics chips will decline by 50 percent next year or a $250 million decline in revenue. He also forecasts video game console demand will decline by 5.5 percent in 2018.” As per AMD’s own SEC filings, the company lost over $2.8 billion from 2012 through 2016. However, new releases from AMD suggest that it may be on something of a resurgent track. As Ars reported last month, AMD’s Ryzen and Threadripper processors re-established AMD’s chips as competitive with Intel’s.


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I finally understand what the iPhone X 'notch' is for

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I had an epiphany the other day. 

I was finalizing my review of LG V30, which would be my third review of a “bezel-less” phone in a row. And as I struggled to find the words to describe the V30’s design, which is so similar to all the other big-screened Android flagships that came out lately, I finally realized that the iPhone X’s “notch” is not only a good design choice — it’s a necessary one. 

With the notch, the iPhone X has one extremely important advantage over most other flagship smartphones: It’s different. 

Don’t get me wrong, I still don’t like the notch. I’d still prefer the iPhone X without it — the idea of a phone that’s essentially just a screen is so wonderfully futuristic that I’d be the first in line to buy one (I’ll actually be the first in line to buy the iPhone X anyway, but that’s because it’s kinda my job).  Read more…

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