Senators ask FBI to look into FCC’s cyberattack claims

 The FCC claimed earlier this month that the comment system by which people can weigh in on the proposal to kill net neutrality had been on the receiving end of a distributed denial-of-service attack. Today, a group of Senators asked that the FBI look into it. Read More

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How should startups work with city governments?

 If you want to re-imagine cities, you’ll likely work with city government. Sometimes this means city governments will your customer, but far more often founders will encounter an unfamiliar relationship that includes policy, regulations and enforcement. There are great resources to guide founders through all aspects of customer discovery, but there aren’t yet great frameworks… Read More

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Man Fined $4,000 For 'Liking' Defamatory Posts on Facebook

In what appears to be a first, a court in Switzerland has fined a man the equivalent of over $4,000 just for clicking the “like” button on what a judge said were defamatory Facebook comments. From a report: The court in Zurich found that the man indirectly endorsed and further distributed the comments by using the ubiquitous Facebook “like” button. The man, who was not named in the court’s statement, “liked” several posts written by a third party that accused an animal rights activist of antisemitism, racism and fascism. In court, the man was not able to prove that the claims were accurate or could reasonably be held to be true. “The defendant clearly endorsed the unseemly content and made it his own,” a statement from the court said. The court fined the man a total of 4,000 Swiss francs ($4,100). He has the right to appeal his sentence. Facebook said the case had “no direct link” to the company, and a spokesperson declined to comment.


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Cadillac tech 'talks' to traffic lights so you don’t run them

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Cadillac’s cars are getting even chattier. 

Now they can “talk” to traffic lights to let drivers know when the light is going to turn red, a feature meant to cut down on dangerous last-minute decisions. Cadillac announced this week that it successfully tested the technology, called vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. 

The V2I test comes after the luxury automaker rolled out a feature to enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication back in March, which made its 2017 CTS sedan the first car on the market with the ability to “talk” to other enabled vehicles in its vicinity by sending data about road conditions back and forth through a connected system.  Read more…

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6 innovations that help artists control their environment

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Art and technology have a lot in common.   

Both have a way of pushing boundaries, of helping us look at the world in new ways, and of generating the Next Big Thing.   

Artists and creators alike – whether that means sculptors, animators, museum curators, illustrators, and everyone in between – are constantly looking to new technologies as a way to keep pushing beyond what’s been done before. But this level of innovation requires precise control, whether that’s through the environment or at artist’s tools.   

Here are seven innovations that help artists manage their environment – and the creative process – in entirely new ways.    Read more…

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Amazon begins offering refunds for unauthorized in-app purchases

 Were you one of the many parents surprised to find hundreds of dollars’ worth of Smurfberries charged to your card a few years back? Amazon’s lax in-app purchasing requirements let kids all over the country buy coins and crystals to their hearts’ content, something the FTC frowned on. News that refunds would be available soon broke in April, and the time has come at last. Read More

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