Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated

How do molecules rotate in a solvent? Answering this question is a complicated task since the rotation is perturbed by a large number of surrounding atoms, requiring large-scale computer simulations which are sometimes infeasible. Now, Mikhail Lemeshko from IST Austria has proven that angulons — quasiparticles he proposed two years ago — do in fact form when a molecule is immersed in superfluid helium. This offers a quick and simple description for rotation of molecules in solvents.

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Banded mongooses go to war over sex and territory

Gang warfare is not unique to humans — banded mongooses do it too.Now researchers from the University of Exeter have shed light on the causes of the fights — and found they are most common when females are receptive to breeding and when there is competition over food and territory.

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Mammography trends show improved cancer detection, more biopsies

The shift from film to digital technology appears to have improved cancer detection rates for diagnostic mammography, but also has increased the abnormal interpretation rate, which may lead to more women undergoing biopsies for benign conditions, according to a new study.

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Chemoselective acetalization by a bifuncional cerium phosphate catalyst

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a bifunctional cerium phosphate catalyst for the chemoselective acetalization of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with alcohols. This research demonstrates potential as the heterogeneous catalyst system is reusable, widely applicable to various substrates (16 examples), and affords high chemoselectivity.

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Transforming the carbon economy

A task force commissioned in 2016 by former U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz has proposed a framework for evaluating R&D on recycling carbon dioxide and removing large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere. The goal is to produce a global emissions reduction of at least 1 billion tons of CO2 per year.

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SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018

SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018

The mission will use two of SpaceX’s long-awaited technologies: a crew-rated capsule, the Crew Dragon, and the high-powered Falcon Heavy rocket. The post SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018 appeared first on WIRED.

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Walking Dead Recap Season 7, Episode 11: The Perks of Being the Vikings of the Zombie Apocalypse

Walking Dead Recap Season 7, Episode 11: The Perks of Being the Vikings of the Zombie Apocalypse

Survival, as you may have noticed, demands a certain degree of moral flexibility. The post Walking Dead Recap Season 7, Episode 11: The Perks of Being the Vikings of the Zombie Apocalypse appeared first on WIRED.

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First Signs of Obesity In Some Arctic Groups Have Been Linked To Instant Noodles

schwit1 quotes a report from ScienceAlert: Researchers have noted the first signs of obesity in the native ethnic groups of the Yamalo-Nenets region — an autonomous district that sits on the coast of the Arctic Ocean in Northwest Siberia. According to local experts, obesity has not previously existed in these indigenous populations, but the first cases are now being reported, and a marked change in diet — including instant noodles and pasta — appears to be responsible. The Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug has a population of just over 522,000 people, whose ancestors have survived the permafrost for millennia. The nomadic Nenets and Khanty peoples have been herding reindeer up and down the Yamal tundra — a 700-km-long peninsula that stretches deep into the Arctic Ocean — for 1,000 years, with diets heavily based on venison and fish. But that appears to be changing fast, as researchers note the increasing uptake of chemically processed foods, such as instant noodles and pasta, and the addition of sugar, pastry, and bread to their diets. According to Titovsky, these changes — which have only been occurring over the past few years — have seen the intake of venison and river fish cut by half.


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WHO Issues a List of 12 Most Worrying Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Artem Tashkinov quotes a report from Medical Xpress: The World Health Organization has issued a list of the top dozen bacteria most dangerous to humans, warning that doctors are fast running out of treatment options. WHO said the most-needed drugs are for germs that threaten hospitals, nursing homes and among patients who need ventilators or catheters. The agency said the dozen listed resistant bacteria are increasingly untreatable and can cause fatal infections; most typically strike people with weakened immune systems. At the top of WHO’s list is Acinetobacter baumannii, a group of bacteria that cause a range of diseases from pneumonia to blood or wound infections. In recent years, health officials have detected a few patients resistant to colistin, the antibiotic of last resort. So far, doctors have been able to treat them with other drugs. But experts worry that the colistin-resistant bacteria will spread their properties to other bacteria already resistant to more commonly used antibiotics, creating germs that can’t be killed by any known drugs.


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FCC Chairman Says His Agency Won't Review AT&T's Time Warner Purchase

Today, FCC commissioner Ajit Pai confirmed that his agency would not review AT&T’s Time Warner purchase, clearing the way for the Justice Department to likely approve the deal. Engadget reports: Last month, AT&T revealed how it might structure its deal to acquire Time Warner without having to go through FCC review. The communications giant noted that it “anticipated that Time Warner will not need to transfer any of its FCC licenses … after the closing of the transaction.” That means that the FCC wouldn’t need to review the transaction. “That is the regulatory hook for FCC review,” Pai said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. “My understanding is that the deal won’t be presented to the commission.” The WSJ notes that this would leave the Justice Department as the only governmental agency reviewing the potential deal. Time Warner has said that it has “dozens” of FCC licenses, but the company believes those won’t need to be transferred to AT&T as part of the merger, thus keeping the FCC out of the deal. The report notes that the deal still might not go through even if the FCC won’t review the transaction. There’s a lot of opposition to it from consumer advocacy groups, and President Donald Trump has said he opposes the deal.


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Boston Dynamics Reveals Handle, A Robot That Is 6 Feet Tall, Lifts 100 Pounds, and Jumps Up To 4 Feet

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Popular Mechanics: Back at the beginning of February, a leaked video showed the newest creation from Boston Dynamics — a wheeled humanoid robot called “Handle.” Now the secretive maker of amazing robots has released the full introduction video, revealing some of Handle’s brand new tricks. The wheeled bot can travel up to 9 mph, and as you can see in the video, it has no trouble rolling over some light off-road terrain such as patches of grass and flights of stairs. The bot stands 6.5 feet tall when fully extended, though it often crouches to turn or balance. Batteries power the robot’s electric and hydraulic actuators, allowing it to crouch down, make sharp turns, and lift objects that weigh at least 100 pounds. Handle has enough battery juice to travel about 15 miles on one charge. Oh and one more thing, this rolling bot can leap four feet into the air.


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LG Unveils G6 Android Nougat Smartphone With a Compact 5.7-Inch QHD+ 18:9 Display

MojoKid writes: LG recently unveiled the new G6 smartphone, going completely back to the drawing board versus its predecessor — the not so well-received G5. In its place is a very compact aluminum unibody design and a large 5.7-inch QHD+ display with a 2880×1440 resolution. That display is the main focal point of the G6, and it has a rather unorthodox 18:9 screen ratio, which LG says allows that smartphone to better fit in your hand. LG also notes that the aspect ratio is being adopted as a universal format from the likes of film studios and content providers like Netflix. Its thin bezel also gives the LG G6 an 80 percent screen-to-body ratio. The handset is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 processor along with 4GB of RAM, 32GB of internal storage and a microSD slot, which can accommodate up to an additional 2TB of storage. LG also outfitted the G6 with dual 13-megapixel rear cameras: a wide angle (F2.4 / 125 degree) shooter and a standard camera (F1.8 / 71 degree) with optical image stabilization. The LG G6 launches next month and will be available in Ice Platinum, Mystic White, Astro Black color options. Pricing is TBD. Some other specs include a non-removable 3,300 mAh battery, USB-C connectivity, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.2, fingerprint sensor and an IP68 water and dust resistance rating. It’s also the first non-Google smartphone to come pre-loaded with the Google Assistant. How do you think the LG G6 compares to what we currently know about the soon-to-be-launched Samsung Galaxy S8?


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